https://journal.achsm.org.au/index.php/achsm/issue/feed Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management 2021-01-19T23:53:45-08:00 Yaping Liu yaping.liu@achsm.org.au Open Journal Systems <p>The Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management (APJHM) is a peer-reviewed journal for managers of organisations offering healthcare and aged care services. The APJHM aims to promote the discipline of health management throughout the region by facilitating the transfer of knowledge among readers by widening the evidence base for management practices.<br /><br />*Print 1(1);2006 - 5(1);2010 Online 4(2);2009 - current<br />*ISSN 2204-3136 (online); ISSN 1833-3818 (print) </p> https://journal.achsm.org.au/index.php/achsm/article/view/665 Challenges and their impact on Life Satisfaction of Overseas Trained Doctors in the Host Countries 2021-01-19T23:53:45-08:00 Husa Kazmi hufsa.kazmi@gmail.com Junaid Burney junaidburney.89@gmail.com <p>Overseas Trained Doctors face several challenges whilst going through the registration process, this significantly impacts their life satisfaction. The aim of this paper is to report the challenges OTDs face, the impact of these challenges and the role of social support during the registration process.</p> <p>Ten in- depth, semi structured interviews and 216 self- administered surveys were conducted with OTDs from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Thematic analysis of the interviews and statistical analysis of the surveys were completed. We found limited House Officer and Observership opportunities; lack of adequate, reliable, and clear information; financial constraints; time constraints and lack of government support to be the predominant challenges faced by OTDs. We also found that increase in number of challenges has a weak- negative impact on the OTD’s life satisfaction whilst social support has a moderate - positive impact on the OTDs’ life satisfaction.</p> <p>This paper makes unique theoretical contributions to OTDs’ literature by adding new challenges that previously remained unexplored. These challenges include limited House Officer and Observership opportunities; unclear expectations and lack of feedback in clinical examinations; conflicting policies of the government and its associate departments and lack of government support.</p> <p>The practical implications of this study include streamlining information and its accessibility to OTDs, equal employment opportunities, supporting OTDs’ integration into medical employment, providing financial assistance to OTDs going through the registration process across CANZ and amending current supervision policies of training in Australia.</p> Copyright (c) https://journal.achsm.org.au/index.php/achsm/article/view/663 Insight Into Work-As-Done versus Work-As-Imagined; Staff Perceptions of a Health Service’s ‘Leadership Rounding’ Initiative 2021-01-18T05:12:19-08:00 Madeleine Kendrick 19460000@students.latrobe.edu.au Kevin Kendrick kevin.kendrick@health.wa.gov.au <p><em><span data-contrast="auto">Objective</span></em><em><span data-contrast="auto">:</span></em><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">This article&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">address</span><span data-contrast="auto">es</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;a gap in knowledge regarding work-as-imagined versus work-as-done, regarding how communication channels are used in an Australian public health service.</span><span data-ccp-props="{&quot;201341983&quot;:0,&quot;335559739&quot;:160,&quot;335559740&quot;:259}">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><em><span data-contrast="auto">Design</span></em><em><span data-contrast="auto">:</span></em><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">Semi-structured interviews with 73 staff employed by the health service across 2 hospital sites and 3 clinical specialties were handled using deductive thematic analysis for a wider exploratory research project.</span><span data-ccp-props="{&quot;201341983&quot;:0,&quot;335559739&quot;:160,&quot;335559740&quot;:259}">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><em><span data-contrast="auto">Setting</span></em><em><span data-contrast="auto">:</span></em><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">A&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">large</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;Australian</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">public</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;health service described a&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">Leadership Rounding</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;initiative in its Annual Reports. The initiative sought to establish a direct communication channel from patient-facing staff to visiting executives.&nbsp;</span><span data-ccp-props="{&quot;201341983&quot;:0,&quot;335559739&quot;:160,&quot;335559740&quot;:259}">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><em><span data-contrast="auto">Main&nbsp;</span></em><em><span data-contrast="auto">Outcome Measures:</span></em><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">The&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">Leadership Rounding</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;initiative was advertised as a success in the health service’s Annual Report, however the publication did not specify how this was qualified. We decided to interview staff to see how they experienced this initiative (if at all).&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span data-ccp-props="{&quot;201341983&quot;:0,&quot;335559739&quot;:160,&quot;335559740&quot;:259}">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><em><span data-contrast="auto">Results</span></em><em><span data-contrast="auto">:</span></em><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">From the wider study, 17 individuals were identified to have directly discussed experiencing the&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">Leadership Rounding</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;initiative in their workplace. Of those 17, eight participants described directly interacting with executive-level management. The consensus of the 17 participants were that the&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">Leadership Rounding</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;initiative is a good theory that is poorly implemented in practice.</span><span data-ccp-props="{&quot;201341983&quot;:0,&quot;335559739&quot;:160,&quot;335559740&quot;:259}">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><em><span data-contrast="auto">Conclusions</span></em><em><span data-contrast="auto">:</span></em><strong><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;</span></strong><span data-contrast="auto">This outcome&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">is consistent with management and&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">organisational</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;behavior literature concerning communication channels and management culture in healthcare&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">organisations</span><span data-contrast="auto">, which often fail</span><span data-contrast="auto">s</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;to connect with the priorities and values of patient-facing staff. For improved efficacy, we urg</span><span data-contrast="auto">e healthcare management to</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;remove barriers to the systematic collection</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;and&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">regular&nbsp;</span><span data-contrast="auto">incorporat</span><span data-contrast="auto">ion of</span><span data-contrast="auto">&nbsp;patient-facing staff feedback</span><span data-contrast="auto">.</span><span data-ccp-props="{&quot;201341983&quot;:0,&quot;335559739&quot;:160,&quot;335559740&quot;:259}">&nbsp;</span></p> Copyright (c)